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The distillery

Join us on the Hampden Rum Tour and journey into the heart of this working distillery.

Hampden Estate Rum

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Learn about the 260 year old rum making process still in use today and taste our Pure Single Jamaican Rum.
Explore the picturesque grounds surrounding the Hampden Great House while getting lost in the history of this magnificent estate.

Leaving the town of Falmouth on an unpaved road, we pass through cane fields and bamboo tunnels.

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Past the remains of an old sugar factory and come to an avenue of royal palms that frame Hampden’s beautiful Great House.

Built in the late 18th century next to the distillery, the Great House surrounded by a fabulous tropical garden and visitor’s center.

The distillery is a step back in time, unchanged since the 18th century. It is the quintessential spirit lover's dream.

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The Boiling House is devoted to fermentation: you walk on old wooden floors and walkways, flanked by dozens of truncated cone-shaped wooden vats where the fermentation happens. At Hampden, fermentation is like a dream for anyone who can grasp the magic and mystery of this process that can transform flour into bread, grapes into wine and fermented sugarcane into rum.  The process lasts between 8 and 15 days and takes place in the wooden vats whose slats speak of the passing of time. This happens thanks to the wild yeasts that live and reproduce in the fermentation rooms.

Leaving the Boiling House, we arrive to Hampden's four iconic pot stills that are the heart of the distillery.

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The oldest is a John Dore, which was installed in 1960 and can contain 2,000 gallons (7,560 litres). The Vendome dates back to 1994 and can contain 5,000 gallons (18,900 litres); it is installed on a “covered veranda” and is the only still that faces the sugarcane fields surrounding the distillery. The Forsyth still came into operation in 2010, with a capacity of 5,000 gallons. In 2016 the fourth pot still joined the others: built by the South African firm TNT, it also has a capacity of 5,000 gallons. Adjoining the main building are the ageing rooms and the large “pool” where they produce the pure sugar cane vinegar which, added at the fermentation stage, gives Hampden rum its unique and unmistakable aromatic bouquet.

The distillery: join the tour

Join us on the Hampden Rum Tour and journey into the heart of this working distillery.

Discover more

Learn about the 260 year old rum making process still in use today and taste our Pure Single Jamaican Rum.
Explore the picturesque grounds surrounding the Hampden Great House while getting lost in the history of this magnificent estate.

Leaving Falmouth, you head towards Wakefield on a fairly terrible road.

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After the village, an unpaved road begins, passing through a wonderful tunnel of bamboo then alongside what remains of the old sugar factory, closed since 2001, and finally coming to the avenue of royal palms that leads to the Great House, the most sumptuous “habitation” in the entire Caribbean.

Built in the late 18th century and surrounded by a fabulous tropical garden, the Great House stands next to the distillery and the small visitor centre, which are open to tourists.

The distillery is a step back in time, and perhaps the nearest thing to a rum connoisseur’s dream of a rum distillery.

Discover more

The Boiling House is devoted to fermentation: you walk on old wooden floors and walkways, flanked by dozens of truncated cone-shaped wooden vats where the fermentation happens. At Hampden, fermentation is like a dream for anyone who can grasp the magic and mystery of this process that can transform flour into bread, grapes into wine and fermented sugarcane into rum.  The process lasts between 8 and 15 days and takes place in the wooden vats whose slats speak of the passing of time. This happens thanks to the wild yeasts that live and reproduce in the fermentation rooms.

Close to the Boiling House, there is the distillation area with its four Pot Stills.

Discover more

The oldest is a John Dore, which was installed in 1960 and can contain 2,000 gallons (7,560 litres). The Vendome dates back to 1994 and can contain 5,000 gallons (18,900 litres); it is installed on a “covered veranda” and is the only still that faces the sugarcane fields surrounding the distillery. The Forsyth still came into operation in 2010, with a capacity of 5,000 gallons. In 2016 the fourth pot still joined the others: built by the South African firm TNT, it also has a capacity of 5,000 gallons. Adjoining the main building are the ageing rooms and the large “pool” where they produce the pure sugar cane vinegar which, added at the fermentation stage, gives Hampden rum its unique and unmistakable aromatic bouquet.